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Don’t Let Your Pets Ruin Your Home Sale

by Desi Sowers

You love your fur babies. They are part of your family.  But not everyone feels the same way you do about your pets, or even pets in general. According to a 2017 report put out by the National Association of Realtors, pet ownership has a “moderate to major impact” when selling a home.  So, if you want to get top dollar for your home, it’s important that you consider the amount you might lose with a dog, cat or other animal in residence.

There are many reasons why potential buyers may not like your pets:

  • Nervousness.  Pets make some people very uncomfortable.  Maybe they never had pets growing up, or they simply don’t enjoy being around animals.
  • Fear.  Whether real or irrational, some people are truly scared of animals.
  • Your pets are not their pets.  Even if they are pet owners and animal lovers, they don’t know your pets or what you allow them to do. 

The number one solution for not allowing pets to ruin a home sale is to relocate them while your house is on the market.  While it might be painful and upsetting to do this, it is the best option.  At minimum, you should try to remove your pets from the house during open houses and when the home is being shown. 

  • Ask a friend or relative to care for your fur babies.
  • Board them at a kennel.
  • If possible, take them to work with you for the day.
  • Move out and take them with you.

If this seems extreme to you and there is NO way you could (or would) relocate your four-legged loved ones while trying to sell, here are some tips for making your home as appealing as possible to homebuyers:

  • Cat litter boxes and doggy potty pads - keep them OUT OF SIGHT and impeccably clean. Nothing turns off buyers faster than opening the laundry room door and being greeted by the offensive scent of your cat’s business.
  • Carpet and floor pet stains - Hire professionals to get rid of the stains, or replace any carpet, padding and flooring that has been ruined by pets. Buyers will spot them and form opinions about the whole house because of them.
  • Pet odors and smells - You probably don’t smell it anymore because you live with them…but chances are your home has eau de doggy (or kitty).  Bring in a neighbor to do a whiff test.  Don’t use strong air fresheners to try to cover up the aroma because some people are allergic to those types of scents.  Try enzyme cleaners such as Simple Solution, Nature’s Miracle or call a professional ozone company.

You will also need to remove any signs of your pets:

  • Remove online photos of your pets in your house.
  • Seal up doggie doors.
  • Put away food and water bowls when not in use.
  • Vacuum religiously.  Every day.  Sometimes twice a day.
  • Put away pet toys.
  • Pack up kitty condos and any other cat paraphernalia.
  • Remove photos of your pets from the refrigerator, walls and table tops.
  • Pack up all cages, carriers and animal beds.

If your house is being shown and you can’t take your pet out, put them in their crate or carrier and attach a note asking that they not be disturbed.  The last thing you need is a buyer sticking their hand in and getting scratched or bitten.  You cannot predict how an animal react when locked up and alone.  Never let your pets run loose when buyers are looking at your house!

 

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/To-Renovate-or-Not-to-Renovate-Should-You-Fix-Up-Your-Home-or-Sell-it-As-Is

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Ten-Décor-Trends-to-Avoid-in-2017

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Real-Estate-Myths-Dont-Let-Them-Fool-You

Selling Your House or Renting It Out - Pros and Cons

by Desi Sowers

Whether moving for a job or just relocating for personal reasons, you still must decide what to do with your current home.  Should you rent it out?  Or sell it?  There are many circumstances to consider before making that decision.  How long do you have before you move?  What is the housing market doing in your area?  And do you have someone you can trust to manage your property?

Of course, the biggest motivator in your decision is which option will be most financially profitable.   If you have a lot of equity in your house and can sell it, you’ll walk away with some cash to put toward your new home.  If the house is paid off, you’ll walk away with A LOT of cash.  However, if your equity is built up and you have low mortgage payments (or no mortgage payment), you could bring in a substantial monthly income by renting the house for more than your monthly payments.  You do have to consider the costs involved with renting the house out.  If you’re relocating to another town, you will likely have to hire a property manager to collect rent and take care of issues that come up.  You might also have to pay to advertise the home.

There are going to be risks involved either way.  If you put the house up for sale, you run the risk of not selling it quickly and possibly ending up with two mortgage payments or a house payment and rent payment on a new place.  But renting out your house might be a bigger risk. There’s a chance you will rent it to people who you think will be good tenants, but wind up paying the rent late or not at all.  There is also the risk that renters will not take care of the house and lower its value.

Another issue to consider is that housing markets can greatly fluctuate from year to year. You must question whether your neighborhood is in the kind of shape to support a quick sale.  If other homes haven’t been selling, for example, you might not get as much for your house as you might if you could wait a year or two and rent it out in the meantime.  On the other hand, if the housing market is hot in your neighborhood, it might just be the best time to take advantage of it and sell to get the best price possible.

Finally, you have to think about whether you can afford a new mortgage while you still own the first house.  Per Kiplinger, lenders count about 75 percent of the income you receive from renters when figuring out if they’ll give you a new loan, but that’s only if you have a signed lease and your salary is sufficient to cover the rest of the mortgage requirement.  Selling your house will make it much easier for you to qualify for a new loan.

The bottom line is that, after doing your research, you can decide whether selling or renting is the best and most financially sound choice for you.

 

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Paint-Colors-that-Sell

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Moving-Day-Survival-Kit

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/To-Renovate-or-Not-to-Renovate-Should-You-Fix-Up-Your-Home-or-Sell-it-As-Is

Paint Colors that Sell!

by Desi Sowers

If you’re thinking about painting the rooms in your house, why not think about resale value while you’re at it?  Of course, you will want to choose colors that appeal to you personally, but at the same time you may want to consider how those colors might affect potential buyers in the future.  Looks aren’t everything, but they are important when making an impression on people who may possibly purchase your home.  Here is a palette you may want to consider if you want to make more money when you sell:

According to Zillow kitchens painted in light blue to soft gray-blue tones brought in $1,809 more than other colors while kitchens painted yellow saw resale value drop by about $820. 

Bathrooms painted light blue or periwinkle can bring in $5,440 more on average, while bathrooms painted in varied shades of white reduced home sale prices by about $4,035.

When it comes to your bedroom, the blues win again!  A pink one can cost you about a $200 loss in resale value, while a light cerulean or cadet blue bedroom can bring you an extra $1,856.


Blues seem to be the colors of choice for most rooms in the house when it comes to resale value, but one room where that is not the case is the living room. Zillow found that a light beige, pale taupe and oatmeal color tends to add $1,809 to home sales, while living rooms painted in varied shades of blue, silver and gray lose out on approximately $820.


So, if you’re looking for a low-cost way to upgrade your home, break out the paint brushes and make sure to choose the right colors to get more bang for your buck when you sell!

 

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/To-Renovate-or-Not-to-Renovate-Should-You-Fix-Up-Your-Home-or-Sell-it-As-Is

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Ten-Décor-Trends-to-Avoid-in-2017

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/The-Best-Chance-For-Selling-Your-New-River-Valley-VA-Home

Blacksburg VA Home Sales April 2017

by Desi Sowers

Desi Sowers has distinguished herself as a leader in the New River Valley real estate market. Desi assists buyers looking for New River Valley real estate for sale and aggressively markets New River Valley homes for sale.

Desi brings with her a keen eye for the details of buying or selling a New River Valley home and seemingly boundless determination and energy, which is why her clients benefit from her unique brand of real estate service. Rooted in Tradition, Focused on the Future – Desi Sowers will help make the most of your New River Valley real estate experience. Give her a call today, 540-320-1328, and discover the difference she can make during your family's move.

Moving Day Survival Kit

by Desi Sowers

You’ve closed on your new home and it’s time to move in!  This is an exciting time, but can also be a bit stressful.  Where do you even begin?  A good place to start is to create a moving day survival kit for yourself. It should include anything and everything that is important or of great value to you and should stay with you and not go with movers. Here is a list of “must have” items to make your move as organized and stress-free as possible:

  • Toilet Paper.  At least a few rolls. Trust me on this one.
  • Pain reliever and all your medications.  You don’t want to be searching for these necessities, so make sure they are easily accessible.
  • Toilet Plunger.  Yes, really. Especially if your new place only has one bathroom. Better safe than sorry!
  • Cash for tipping your movers.
  • A Multi-Tool.  While having a whole tool box handy would be great, there is only so much you can (and should) fit into your survival kit.  Something like a Leatherman will provide you with a way to open boxes and other small tasks…and it will fit in your pocket!
  • Trash Bags.  And clear recycling bags.  Look up where you can recycle locally and have the address in your phone so you can take packing boxes/materials there after you unpack.
  • Power Strip and Mobile Phone Charger.  There is nothing worse than discovering your phone is dying and you have no idea where your charger is!  The power strip will come in handy because you will probably clear one small area and can plug in your electronics, a lamp, a coffee pot, etc.…
  • Personal Hygiene Items.  Pack an overnight bag with your toothbrush, toothpaste, deodorant, soap, shampoo etc.  That way, when you are ready to call it a day you can jump right in the shower without having to search through boxes for them.
  • All Purpose Cleaner and a Roll of Paper Towels (or two). Hopefully move-in day won’t be cleaning day, but you never know.  Be prepared.  Even if the house looks clean, you are going to want to wipe down the toilets, sinks and counters.
  • Bottled Water and Granola Bars.   You are going to be hungry. And tired.  Have water and snacks on hand to get you through the day.  Look up some Take Out Restaurants and have their numbers in your phone so you can have food delivered.
  • First Aid Kit.  Well, at least a box of Band-Aids in case you cut yourself opening boxes.
  • Note Pad and Pen.  Because you WILL come up with a list of things you need and need to do as you are unpacking and you will want to write them down so you don’t forget.
  • Scented Candles or Air Fresheners.  Even the cleanest house will smell a little musty if it has been closed up for a while.
  • Flashlight.  Some rooms won’t have overhead lights and if you haven’t unpacked the lamps yet, a flashlight will come in handy.

Enjoy your new home!  And if you haven’t found your dream home yet visit desisowers.com and start your search today!

If you are preparing to list your house for sale, you may be wondering if the financial reward will be worth the time, effort and money to fix up things that are in disrepair or that are dated.  The answer to that question depends on a myriad of circumstances such as the current real estate market, the condition of competing inventory and whether or not the renovations that need to be made generally provide a return on investment.

Some home buyers are looking to purchase a "fixer upper".  They are looking for properties priced to sell, perhaps because they don’t qualify for more expensive homes or maybe because they want to make a profit by fixing the home up themselves.  Most fixer buyers want to do simple repairs such as painting walls, replacing light fixtures and putting in new carpet. Only a few want to take a house down to the studs and completely redo it.  These potential buyers will want a price for the home that will allow for all the repairs, the inconvenience of doing the work, and often a bit more.  For example, if a home is worth $200,000 fixed up but needs a new roof, and the roof costs approximately $10,000, a buyer most likely will not offer $190,000 for this home.  The reason is that they can probably find a similar house that already has a new roof for $200,000 and save themselves the headache of replacing it themselves.  A buyer in this situation might offer $175,000 or less, in which case it would make more sense for the seller to replace the roof and sell it for $200,000.

It’s important to note that many buyers are looking for "turn-key" homes.  They fear having to make major repairs because they might be more costly than anticipated or other problems might be revealed.  Even if the price is right, homes listed for sale in “as is” condition might not attract as many buyers.

However, before doing major renovations, there are many things to consider.  Smart sellers will research what their home’s market value will be once improvements are made and compare it to the cost of the renovations. If an upgrade won’t provide return on the investment, it probably doesn’t make sense to do it.  Knowing the condition of your competition is helpful.  For example, if other homes for sale in your neighborhood all have modern kitchens, it might make sense to update yours.  This doesn’t mean you should tear it down and start from scratch.  Often a minor kitchen remodel will suffice.  Also, keep in mind that kitchen and bathroom remodels are known to bring the best return on investment.

Start by making a list of the things in your home that are dated or in disrepair and then prioritize.  Here is a list of 10 minimum improvements to make before putting your house on the market:

  • Patch all holes and cracks in walls and ceilings.
  • Fix all appliances and HVAC systems.
  • Repair leaky faucets.
  • Replace worn carpeting.
  • Repaint dark or marred walls in neutral colors (not white).
  • Replace broken windows.
  • Repair the roof.
  • Change dated light fixtures/ceiling fans.
  • Replace old linens/window coverings.
  • Fix any code violations.

If your real estate market is a seller’s market and homes are moving quickly, you can get by with fewer fix ups, however a home that needs repairs will still deliver a lower price.  If it’s a buyer’s market, people might not even be willing to look at homes that need repairs.  Desi  Sowers can help you understand the current market in The New River Valley so that you can make informed decisions about whether to sell your house “as is” or not. 

Negotiation 101

by Desi Sowers

It seems that negotiation has become a lost art in the world of real estate, and that’s unfortunate because the truth of the matter is, if you don’t ask…you don’t get. While sellers want the highest price and buyers want the best deal, they must meet somewhere in the middle for the deal to close. Negotiation is a vital part of selling or buying a home because it is the largest asset people own and there is a lot of money at stake. Here are some guidelines for what sellers and buyers might ask for in real estate negotiations:

  1. Price

Negotiating the best price means different things for sellers and buyers.  The seller wants the highest price and the buyer wants to pay as little as possible.  For a successful transaction, they have to compromise and come up with a price that is acceptable to both.

  1. Closing Costs

Prepaid closing costs are paid by buyers for their mortgage.  These are funds that the mortgage lender holds in escrow for expenses like taxes and insurance.  A buyer may ask a seller to cover some or all their closing costs either with a flat dollar amount or up to a percentage of what’s an allowable contribution for a lender.  If a buyer asks the seller to do this, they are likely going to pay a higher asking price.

  1. Closing Date

Sometimes sellers want to get out of a home quickly because they need the capital from that house they are selling to put toward a new real estate purchase.  The closing date will also affect they buyer’s monthly cash-flow because when a buyer closes on a house, they skip the next month’s mortgage payment, therefore they may want to negotiate to close at the beginning of a month.

  1. Financing Contingencies

When there is a financing contingency in place for a real estate transaction, it can tie up a seller’s property for a required 30 to 60 days.  For this reason, many buyers prefer buyers coming to the table with cash offers. If you are competing with cash buyers, you may want to figure out if you can drop the financial contingency, which will shorten the closing time line. You can do this by getting pre-approved for a home loan prior to making an offer.  Mortgage preapproval shows that your finances are in order and you can afford the home.

  1. Home Warranty

As a buyer, you can request a home warranty. As a seller, you can offer one.  This home protection plan covers things like appliances and systems such as the hot water heater or air conditioning, in the event they repair or replacement.

  1. Leaseback

The moving process is stressful and labor intensive.  Sometimes a seller will need extra time to get into their new home.  When this happens, buyers can offer a zero-cost rent-back for 30 to 90 days to persuade the seller to accept their offer over others. 

  1. Home Repairs

With a home that needs a lot of updating there comes ample opportunity for negotiation. Buyers need to consider the cost of bringing the home up to current standards and use the estimate of that cost to request a lower asking price.  The seller, on the other hand, can specify that the house is being sold “as is” and not offer any repairs.

  1. Appraisal Contingency

A seller can push for a buyer to waive the appraisal contingency, however, if for some reason the appraisal falls short of the expected amount, they need to be prepared for the amount of cash they might have to pay should the bank only be willing to lend them money based on the appraised value.

  1. Furniture

Personal property such as patio furniture, window treatments and chandeliers is all up for grabs.  If the buyer can ask for these things to be included in the contract.  Sellers need to determine what they are willing to leave behind.  And any exclusions need to be specifically listed in the contract as well.

  1. Appliances

Depending on the market, sellers don’t always leave every appliance for the buyer.  They may include the dishwasher, stove and built in microwave in the contract but not the refrigerator, washer and dryer.  Sometimes they don’t want to give everything away up front so that they can use these as items for negotiation.

  1. Inspection

When sellers waive inspection, they often find themselves with "buyer's remorse", but they can try to shorten the time frame for inspection, from ten days to five.  However, today’s lending practices and the TILA RESPA Integrated Disclosure (TRID) make this hard to do.

  1. Condo/Co-op Assessments

These are fees that are used to maintain common areas in a community. If there is an open assessment, it can become a negotiation between the buyer and seller as to who will pay for it.

 

If you are interested in buying or selling a New River Valley home, contact Desi Sowers at 540-320-1328, and discover the difference she can make during your family's move. 

 

Ten Décor Trends to Avoid in 2017

by Desi Sowers

If you are looking to update your home décor, whether to sell your house or just to give it a refreshing new look, here are ten décor trends to avoid in 2017.

Brass

While this metal can bring a shiny appeal, overuse of it may be, well, overwhelming.  If you love this look, try mixing metals and/or using them as small accent pieces.

Edison Bulbs

It seems that designers have become bored with the industrial décor theme, and old fashioned hanging bulbs are out. Instead, try retro lighting that appeals to you and fits with your home décor.

All White Rooms

2017 will leave all white rooms behind in favor of rooms in bold colors such as navy blue.  Navy is the new face of modern design and adds warmth and freshness to previously pristine, yet clinical feeling rooms.

Indigo Needs to Go

This hue has been everywhere the past few years and has worn out its welcome.  If you like this color, try using a variation of blue tones instead.

Sharp Edges

A boxy item here and there is ok, but in 2017 rounded edges and circular furniture will be making a comeback.  It’s time to “take the edge off” and create calm and comfortable spaces.

DIY Everything

If you are a crafty, creative person, there is nothing better than spending a rainy afternoon on a DIY project. But if everything in your home décor is DIY, it’s time to make a change. In 2017 easy and quick crafts are out and artisanal works that require a high skill level are in.

Brushed Metal

With the overall industrial décor trend going by the wayside, it’s time to say goodbye to burnished metals.  Warmer, shinier metals like bronze and gold will take their place.

Smooth and Sleek Rooms

The simplicity of a smooth and sleek room is going to be a thing of the past as we move into 2017.  This year you will want to transform your room with texture adding warmth and charm to previously “flat” rooms.

Oversized Furniture

Oversized furniture will exit in 2017 as space becomes more important in home décor. Space efficient furniture will take its place.

Chevron

Designers are now avoiding the zig zag pattern of Chevron, especially prints that have only two to three colors, which can sometimes look cheap and two-dimensional.

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Top-10-Remodeling-Projects-for-Adding-Value-to-Your-Home

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Paint-to-Live-vs-Paint-to-Sell

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Get-unhinged-3-ways-to-create-visually-striking-doors-in-your-home

Lucky Number 7 for First-Time Homeowners

by Desi Sowers

With the tax code constantly changing, first-time homebuyers need to educate themselves to understand year-to-year changes.  As an incentive to buy homes, the government provides tax breaks to existing and new homeowners.  Homeowners receive multiple tax deductions, tax credits and other breaks that aren’t available to those who rent.  If you bought your first home in 2016, it is smart to familiarize yourself with current homeowner tax breaks so you can take advantage of them and save some money.

  1. HOME MORTGAGE INTEREST DEDUCTION

The mortgage interest deduction is one of the largest home tax breaks and is a significant new homeowner tax credit.  It covers interest paid on loans of up to $1 million, or $500,000 if you’re married but filing a separate return. This deduction can especially benefit borrowers with new loans because interest changes on mortgages are typically steeper in the early years of the mortgage’s term. Don’t miss out on this money saving tax credit.  Your loan provider should send you a form 1098 which will show how much interest you paid the previous year.

Instructions For Home Mortgage Interest Deduction

 

  1. MORTGAGE INTEREST CREDIT

The federal government's mortgage interest credit provides another chance for first-time homebuyers to claim a tax break for the mortgage interest they paid. Unlike the mortgage interest deduction,             which reduces your taxable income, this mortgage interest credit directly counts against your tax bill, lowering what you owe.  To be eligible for this strategic tax break, a state or local government must have issued you a MORTGAGE CREDIT CERTIFICATE.  Typically, this certificate is issued when you originate your mortgage.  It tells you how much interest you can claim as a credit.  If you also claim a    mortgage interest deduction when you file your taxes, you must reduce the credit by that amount.   Mortgage Interest Credit Form

 

  1. MORTGAGE POINTS DEDUCTION

You can also deduct what you pay in points to obtain the mortgage loan in the first place. Mortgage points are prepaid interest that can help a borrower qualify for a lower interest rate over the life of the loan. How to Deduct Mortgage Points on Your Tax Return

 

  1. TAX FREE IRA WITHDRAWALS

Saving money for a down payment and closing costs is something many people have to do when buying a home. The IRS says you can pull funds from your IRA to help. You can take up to $10,000 from your IRA without penalty to buy a home, although you'll still need to pay taxes on the money. Your 401k plan does not qualify for the exception to the 10 percent penalty. How to Tap an IRA for a Home Purchase

 

  1. PROPERTY TAX DEDUCTION

Property taxes are one of the many advantageous tax breaks for first-time homebuyers. You can deduct property taxes paid during the year for which you're filing. If you purchase a home midway through the tax year, you can claim all taxes paid from the date of sale onward.  How to Claim Property Taxes

 

  1. HOME IMPROVEMENT TAX BREAKS

Improvements you make to a home can qualify for a tax break. If you use a home equity loan or other loan secured by your home to finance improvements, the loan will qualify for the same mortgage interest deductions as your main mortgage.  Home Improvements that are Tax Deductible

 

  1. HOME ENERGY TAX BREAKS

Unfortunately, two property-related home improvement tax credits have been eliminated as of Jan. 1, 2017. That means both credits will no longer apply beginning with the 2017 tax year.  They are: the Nonbusiness Energy Property Credit and the Residential Energy Property Tax Credit.  However, you can still claim these credits if you made qualifying improvements to your home during the 2016 tax year. Keep all receipts and contracts from the home improvements and use Form 5695 to file for this credit.

 

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Real-Estate-Myths-Dont-Let-Them-Fool-You

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Mortgage-Information

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Top-10-Remodeling-Projects-for-Adding-Value-to-Your-Home

Protect Your Home from Fire: Four Surprising Fire Hazards

by Desi Sowers

It is estimated by The National Fire Protection Association that over 47,000 home fires reported to fire departments are caused by some kind of electrical failure as a trigger to ignition.  But there are some other unusual ways that fires can start that we should all be aware of.

Dishwashers

While you may be aware that overheating dryers or ovens can cause fires, you might think dishwashers are safe because they have water. And water puts out fires…right? Wrong!  Dishwasher fires can be caused by liquids coming into contact with the machine’s wires.  Serious damage can occur when fires are ignited in dishwashers.  According to a 25 year veteran of the New York City Fire Department, any appliance that powers a motor, heating element, or both always has a higher risk for fire - and dishwashers are a common example.  He advises that they never be turned on when going to sleep or leaving the home.

Jars and other glass objects

According to survivalists, one of the best ways to start a fire is to use a piece of glass to refract sunlight onto dry wood.  Without proper care, that same scientific process can happen on your own kitchen table.  In 2015 a fire broke out in a southwest London home because of sun rays reflecting through an empty Nutella jar, the Associated Press reported.  While it may seem to be an freakish way for a fire to start, the fire brigade’s investigative unit confirmed that the glass jar was to blame.  The chances of this happening in your home are slim, but it is important to remember to never store flammable liquids like gasoline, cleaning fluids, paint thinners and even cooking oils in glass jars that you intend to leave out in the sunlight.  Metal cans for commercial-use flammable liquids and plastic containers for things such as cooking oils are safer options.

Rodents

Small rodents like squirrels and rats like to burrow into your attic insulation in cold weather and chew anything they can get their teeth on, including rubber covered electrical lines.  Unfortunately, if electrical wires become exposed dud to their protective insulation being compromised, there is a likelihood of igniting a flame.  The key to preventing this from happening is to keep the critters out to begin with. Before winter season, make sure all vents are covered, holes are patched and cracks are sealed.

Laptops

If you have ever had your laptop computer in your, well, lap for an extended period of time, you know that they get hot.  Because of this, it is a bad idea to leave one sitting on a flammable surface such as bedding, furniture or carpet.  But the real culprit behind laptop fires is the lithium in the batteries.  A poorly made battery can overheat and burst into flames.  Recently the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones were recalled because they were catching on fire and it was the lithium batteries that were the problem.  Any device powered by lithium ion batteries should be shut off when not in use and stored away from any flammable items.

 

More hidden home fire hazards  HERE!

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/Home-Maintenance-for-Winter

http://www.desisowers.com/Blog/12-Simple-Home-Repairs-to-Lift-You-Out-of-Winters-Funk

Displaying blog entries 11-20 of 22

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